The Vagaries Of Capital Punishment

in Homicide, on

The death penalty has equally passionate arguments on both sides. Because of this, the history of the death penalty in the United States — not to mention here in North Carolina — has been turbulent.

A law professor has released a new book about the death penalty and how it has changed over the years. He points out that, on average, only 10 percent of people sentenced to death in the U.S. actually are executed. He argues that the death penalty is unpredictable because it is difficult to tell which people, sentenced to capital punishment, will meet that sentence.

In 1972, the Supreme Court put an end to executions in our country. In 1976, however, the Court changed its stance, and executions were allowed to resume. Read more about the issue by clicking on the link below.

Source: KQED News, “Years After Historic Ruling, Execution Still A ‘Random’ Justice,” Sept. 19, 2013