‘Mass Incarceration’ Ending? Prison Numbers Fall 3 Years In A Row

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North Carolina’s prison population dropped by more than 1,000 people last year, and the state was not alone. More than half the states in the U.S. reported lower prison numbers. The overall drop was 1.7 percent — more than 15,000 people across the country. This is in opposition to historical trends. Beginning in the 1970s,
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Compassion Lacking for Prisoners Asking for ‘compassionate Leave’

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Federal prison authorities have the power to release inmates from custody before the completion of their sentences when there are unusual circumstances, such as the prisoner being very ill or in the process of dying. This power was given to them explicitly in 1984 by an act of Congress. A report on what the federal
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Prisoners Stage Hunger Strike for Better, Safer Medical Care

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Officials at Central Prison in Raleigh confirmed this week that nine prisoners have been refusing meals. One prisoner, apparently the spokesman for the hunger strike, indicated in a letter that as many as 100 inmates planned to participate. A representative from the North Carolina Department of Public Safety said that prison staff would be monitoring
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Buddy, Can You Spare a Jackson? Prisoners Phone Home at a Price

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Even prisoners need a chance to call home, but thanks to jail officials’ heartless decisions, few of these prisoners may have had the opportunity to speak to their mothers on Mother’s Day this year. Inmates in North Carolina, whether jailed for misdemeanors or felonies, say that they are victims of price gouging. Phone carriers charge more
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Jails Will Take More of State’s Misdemeanor Offenders in 2012

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Beginning in January, North Carolina offenders sentenced to six months or less will serve their time in county jails rather than the state’s prisons. Offenders sentenced to 90 days or less will still serve their time in county jails, but those convicted of more serious misdemeanors like assault will no longer automatically go to minimum-custody
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