Prosecutors: if at First We Don’t Convict, We’ll Try, Try Again

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The U.S. Supreme Court ruled recently that investigators improperly obtained data from a GPS device that tracked the comings and goings of a suspect. The prosecutors may not be able to use that data, but they are determined to mount a third trial against the defendant. He was arrested in 2005 on drug charges and
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Minority: Court’s Gps Decision Doesn’t Tackle the Tough Issues

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The U.S. Supreme Court issued a unanimous decision this week regarding GPS tracking of a criminal suspect, just one of the many criminal cases before the Court this term. The ruling upheld the lower court opinions that police need a search warrant before they can use a GPS device to track the movements of a
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I See You! is Gps Tracking a Fourth Amendment Violation? (4)

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We are finishing up our discussion of a case currently before the U.S. Supreme Court that addresses privacy and GPS tracking devices. The case involved a suspect in a drug trafficking investigation. Police placed a GPS tracking device on his car and followed his movements all day, every day for four weeks. They eventually were
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I See You! is Gps Tracking a Fourth Amendment Violation? (3)

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We have been talking about a criminal case argued before the U.S. Supreme Court. The defendant in the underlying case claims that police violated his Fourth Amendment right to privacy when they planted a GPS device on his car and tracked his comings and goings for four weeks. Though a judge had signed a warrant, there
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I See You! is Gps Tracking a Fourth Amendment Violation? (2)

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We are continuing our discussion of a case argued before the U.S. Supreme Court recently. The defendant believes his privacy was violated when the police planted a GPS tracking device on his car and tracked his movements for two months. The investigation culminated with his arrest and subsequent indictment for drug crimes. The police made
Continue Reading I See You! is Gps Tracking a Fourth Amendment Violation? (2)