STARR Program Provides Hope For Inmates Struggling With Addiction

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Durham County’s Substance Abuse Treatment And Recidivism Reduction program accepts men and women who volunteer or are court-ordered to participate. The STARR program, operating out of the Durham County Detention Facility, treats chemical dependency and addresses behaviors that may lead to criminal activity. STARR includes a number of tactics to treat chemical dependency, including group
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Supreme Court Ruling, Economy Slow Down Crime Lab

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A 2009 Supreme Court ruling has had a significant impact on how some North Carolina criminal matters are processed. The case,Melendez-Diaz vs. Massachusetts, requires lab technicians to present evidence in court, rather than by affidavit, in certain criminal trials. What does this mean for Raleigh’s State Bureau of Investigation crime lab? The toxicologists who work
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Report: Changes to Drug Sentencing Guidelines Have Been Successful

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As we discussed in a previous post, sentencing for federal drug crimes is serious and strict. Oftentimes, people convicted of drug crimes — whether it is for drug possession, distribution or trafficking — spend years in federal prison. Certain types of drugs are also treated more harshly than others under federal law, including crack cocaine.
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Sentencing for Federal Drug Crimes is Strict, Serious

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Federal drug charges can involve accusations of drug possession, drug distribution, drug trafficking and other offenses. In dealing with these serious charges, federal courts differ from state courts in significant ways. For people who have been accused of federal drug crimes, one of the most monumental differences is how sentences are handed down. One might
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Bill Would Add Up to 6 Years to Sentences for Meth Crimes P2

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We are continuing our discussion of House Bill 29, currently under consideration by the North Carolina General Assembly. The bill would change methamphetamine crimes and sentencing in two ways. First, it would put a new crime on the books, a Class H felony for manufacturing meth if the offender has a prior conviction for a meth
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