Prescription Drug Abuse

The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has warned a lot of Americans about the dangers of prescription drug abuse. Of course, others may say that there has been a decrease in some use of illegal drugs such as cocaine, however it is still important to consider the dangers of prescription drug abuse.

According to the National Survey of Drug Use and Health, nearly a third of people aged 12 and over have developed symptoms of prescription drug abuse by first using these drugs in non-medical ways. While drug use has been decreasing, opioid prescription and abuse prevention is still a heavily-debated topic on a lot of fields.

The use of prescription drugs is still a serious problem with teenagers and young adults. In fact, studies show that teenagers in the United States are more likely to have abused prescription drugs than illegal street drugs. This is because a lot of teenagers may think that prescription drugs are safe because they were prescribed. Unfortunately, they are not suited for nonmedical use or for “self-medication.”

For those curious about how to prevent drug abuse, it is first important to remember that one cannot just take a pill randomly. It is extremely dangerous as a lot of pills look the same, and they may elicit different reactions from different users. Remember, prescription drugs are only safe for those with prescriptions for them, and no one else.

Prescription drugs that are taken for recreational use actually fall on multiple categories. However, there are four general categories for these cases:

Depressants are often referred to as depressants for the central nervous system. These are drugs for the brain and spinal cord as these slow brain functions. Falling under this category are sedatives as they make a person calm and even drowsy, and  tranquilizers that can reduce tension and anxiety.

Meanwhile, opioids and morphine derivatives are painkillers. These drugs contain opium or opium-like substances, and are mostly used to relieve pain.

Stimulants are a class of drugs that are intended to increase the way people perceive and detect stimuli. These increase energy and alertness, but unfortunately also have various side effects. They can increase blood pressure, heart rate and breathing.

Antidepressants are lastly psychiatric drugs that are prescribed to handle depression or depression-like symptoms. Consult with a expert drug crime lawyer in North Carolina for detailed information.