Where There’s Smoke: Can We Predict Wrongful Convictions?

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If you are arrested for a violent crime in North Carolina that you did not commit, what are the chances you will be convicted anyway? A new study funded by the federal government and conducted by university researchers has identified 10 factors that wrongful convictions have in common. The researchers hope that the results will
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Where There’s Smoke: Can We Predict Wrongful Convictions? P2

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We are talking about a study of common factors in erroneous convictions. The researchers looked at data from the years 1980 to 2012 and identified 460 cases that resulted in wrongful convictions, acquittals or dismissals. Their analysis of those cases revealed 10 factors that they believe can predict a wrongful conviction. Several of the factors
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Bill Would Add Up to 6 Years to Sentences for Meth Crimes P2

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We are continuing our discussion of House Bill 29, currently under consideration by the North Carolina General Assembly. The bill would change methamphetamine crimes and sentencing in two ways. First, it would put a new crime on the books, a Class H felony for manufacturing meth if the offender has a prior conviction for a meth
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Bill Would Add Up to 6 Years to Sentences for Meth Crimes

in Drug Crimes, on

The North Carolina General Assembly is considering a bill right now that will add a new drug crime and increase sentences for existing drug crimes under certain circumstances. House Bill 29, which relates specifically to methamphetamine, has cleared the House and is awaiting debate by the Senate Judiciary Committee. If the law passes, it will
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2nd Degree Murder Plea in Wake Case Raises Competence Questions 2

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Since the Newtown shootings, public debate has focused on gun violence and mental health resources. That tragedy and others have pointed out that neither the government nor the health care sector has figured out the best way to help people with mental illness before they commit a crime. When the crime occurs, it’s left to
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