In North Carolina, Criminal Matters Dominate List of New Laws P2

in Criminal Defense, on

We are picking up the discussion about the slate of new laws that went into effect on Dec. 1. The majority of the 35 measures relate to criminal matters, and many have been covered at length by the media as well as in this blog. A couple of examples are Laura’s Law, the law that
Continue Reading In North Carolina, Criminal Matters Dominate List of New Laws P2

North Carolina Judge Reprimands Prosecutor in Murder Case

in Homicide, on

A North Carolina judge has issued an order dismissing a murder case and accusing the prosecuting attorney of violating the rights of the suspect. The defendant was charged with the one count of murder after police allegedly arrested him while trying to dispose of bones they say belonged to a suspected murder victim. The man’s
Continue Reading North Carolina Judge Reprimands Prosecutor in Murder Case

In North Carolina, Criminal Matters Dominate List of New Laws

in Criminal Defense, on

Criminal defense lawyers in North Carolina took special note of a host of new laws that went into effect on Dec. 1. Most of the laws add new crimes to the books — the Unborn Victims of Violence Act, for example, and Laura’s Law. Still, two add protections for defendants and nonviolent offenders under age
Continue Reading In North Carolina, Criminal Matters Dominate List of New Laws

I See You! is Gps Tracking a Fourth Amendment Violation? (4)

in Criminal Defense, on

We are finishing up our discussion of a case currently before the U.S. Supreme Court that addresses privacy and GPS tracking devices. The case involved a suspect in a drug trafficking investigation. Police placed a GPS tracking device on his car and followed his movements all day, every day for four weeks. They eventually were
Continue Reading I See You! is Gps Tracking a Fourth Amendment Violation? (4)

I See You! is Gps Tracking a Fourth Amendment Violation? (3)

in Criminal Defense, on

We have been talking about a criminal case argued before the U.S. Supreme Court. The defendant in the underlying case claims that police violated his Fourth Amendment right to privacy when they planted a GPS device on his car and tracked his comings and goings for four weeks. Though a judge had signed a warrant, there
Continue Reading I See You! is Gps Tracking a Fourth Amendment Violation? (3)